Post-Doc Position at Washington State University

Dr. Anne Pisor is looking for a postdoc to co-lead a three-year project with co-PI Dr. Monique Borgerhoff Mulder and NGO Mwambao Coastal Community Network. The project is focused on whether between-community social relationships impact resource management — specifically, managing fisheries on the Tanzanian coast. The postdoc will be based in the Human Sociality Lab (www.pisor-lab.com) in Pullman, WA, but will also spend time on site in Tanzania.

Fieldwork, leadership, language, and R skills desired. PhD in any field. Initial 12 month appointment with possibility for renewal for up to two additional years pending satisfactory performance.

Priority review of applications begins Feb 15. Anticipated start date is June 1.

Apply here.

University of Utah Anthropology seeking Assistant Professor of Evolutionary Ecology

Department of Anthropology at University of Utah invites applications for a tenure-track position in evolutionary ecology at the rank of Assistant Professor to begin July 1, 2021 (https://anthro.utah.edu/faculty_recruitment/index.php). The Department of Anthropology at University of Utah seeks diverse candidates who complement this historical strength of the department and take a quantitative, empirical approach to the study of human behavior, biology, or evolution. Applications are due February 1, 2021.

 

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Anthropology or a related field by the time of appointment, an established record of high-quality research indicated by external funding and publications, and evidence of relevant teaching and field work experience. A competitive application will present evidence of teaching and research excellence, or potential for the same. We seek candidates whose research, teaching and service have prepared them to contribute to our commitment to engagement and inclusion of culturally diverse audiences.

 

Apply here: https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/109707

Evolutionary Lecture Exchange Group Sign-Up

Attention HBES faculty:

Are you teaching online in Spring 2021? Would you love to expose your students to more evolutionary-minded researchers? Join our lecture exchange group! We have created a spreadsheet for faculty interested in exchanging prerecorded guest lectures for classes in social psychology, evolutionary psychology, cultural psychology, evolutionary anthropology, and more. We think that this time of online teaching affords an excellent opportunity to expose students to experts on various topics in the study of human behavior.

The idea would be to provide a prerecorded guest lecture that can be used by any participating faculty. Please add your name, lecture topic(s), and email address to our list! And, if there is something you would like for your class, feel free to send the request to that faculty member. They can then send you their recorded lecture.

A wonderful, but not mandatory, accompaniment to the lecture would be to exchange “tea time chats”. That is, allow the professor and/or students in a course to interview you for 10 mins at a mutually convenient time after watching your lecture.

If you would like to be involved in this exchange, sign up here: Lecture exchange

PhD Position at Nations Museum of Natural History, Paris, France

Thesis: body piercing and past human migrations

Phd thesis proposal: National museum of natural history, Paris, France

 

Recommended background: archaeology, or anthropology, or human population

Genetics

 

Lab: Eco-Anthropologie Umr 7206, Musée De L’homme, Paris, France

Duration: 3 years (starting fall 2020)

Supervisors: Franz Manni and Evelyne Heyer

Net salary: 1,400 euro

Contact email: franz.manni@mnhn.fr

 

How to apply:

Contact us before the 11th of June 2020, sending a short motivation Letter, a cv and a list of available master 2 exams scores.  Candidates Will be contacted back. The best candidate will have to prepare some Paperwork by the June, 19, 2020 to be admitted to a formal skype interview Of 20 minutes (10 minutes to illustrate the project and 10 minutes for Questions) to be set 1-3, July, 2020.

 

This phd project is aimed at investigating the spread of ancestral Body piercing practices in relation to past human migrations. This Is to say that body piercing is here considered as a vertically Transmissible cultural trait, maybe having a limited number of origins in time and space.  Like other body modifications (skull deformations, Teeth alterations, scarifications, tattoos, neck elongation, etc.), body Piercing relies on a very specific and quite complex know-how. Although Its symbolism is variable, diachronically and synchronously, the Practice actually relies on the method used to create, heal and enlarge A “tunnel” in the flesh: when the know-how is lost, the practice Becomes hardly possible. This is the research hypothesis of the thesis: The ancestors of the populations who practice(d) body piercing learned How to do it by contact with other populations. The history of body Piercing is likely to mirror past human contacts and migrations.  To be Clear: this doctoral project concerns only the study of traditional Body piercing practiced by many peoples in the world, it does not Directly concern “modern” body piercing emerged in California (the “modern primitives”) in the mid-1970s. Nevertheless, this recent Renaissance has shown that several years have been necessary to develop, Ex nihilo, a viable body piercing technique, meaning that it is not easy to reinvent body piercing. This is why ancestral (“traditional”) body Piercing may have persisted only where the know-how related to it has Been transmitted through direct learning, generation after generation. The oldest body piercing ornament is dated 46,000 years ago (langley et Al. 2016). Although other body modifications (ex: tattooing) can be as Old, body piercing leaves more durable evidence: the ornaments. Easily Recognizable by their shape (rounded, cylindrical, conical, or toroidal), Their symmetry, weight and polishing, body piercing ornaments will be the major object of study of the thesis. Contemporary or old, they are Available in many collections (public or private), this is why fieldwork Will not be necessary.  The project stems from an exhibition that took place at the Musée De L’homme , Paris, France (march 2019/2020; Curator f. Manni) and related work. The candidate will benefit the Help of the research network at the origin of the exhibition (40 Researchers, 12 countries: archaeologists, ethnologists, anthropologists, Curators). Currently the network is involved in the writing of a manual on body modifications to be published by an international academic Publisher. The outcome of the thesis can be included in it.

 

See here for more information

New Video: Richard Alexander, interviewed by Mark Flinn

Conversations with the Pioneers of Evolutionary Biology, Anthropology, and Psychology

On the Origin of the Evolution Revolution: Conversations with the Pioneers of Evolutionary Biology, Anthropology, and Psychology

Co-edited by Barry X. Kuhle & Catherine Salmon
To be published by Cambridge University Press in 2020

Interviews with 14 HBES Pioneers

Bill Irons (43 minutes)
Bobbi Low (28 minutes)
David Buss (52 minutes)
Doug Kenrick (39 minutes)
John Tooby (25 minutes)
Leda Cosmides (30 minutes)
Mark Flinn (20 minutes)
Martin Daly (39 minutes)
Napoleon Chagnon (28 minutes)
Randy Thornhill (17 minutes)
Sarah Hrdy (Interviewed with Bill Irons; 97 minutes)
Steve Pinker (14 minutes)
David Sloan Wilson (36 minutes)
Ed Wilson (105 minutes)

https://www.hbes.com/on-the-origin-of-the-evolution-revolution/

Owen F Aldis Scholarship deadline January 15, 2018

The deadline for submissions for the Owen F Aldis Scholarship, which funds research costs up to $8000, has been extended to January 15th, 2018. The Owen F. Aldis Scholarship Fund was established to support graduate studies in human ethology, defined as the biological study of human behaviour.

Please see the ISHE website for details of the submission procedure: http://ishe.org/awards/owen-f-aldis-scholarship/

Human Behavioral Ecology Bibliography

After a long hiatus, Kermyt Anderson has resuscitated the Human Behavioral Ecology Bibliography (HBEB) as an editable google document. Feel free to add any relevant citations for human behavioral ecology that aren’t in there, especially from 2013 onward. (There are over 1250 pubs listed there — but only about 100 for the past four years.) And please share this link with any colleagues or students who might find it useful.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UxuPjp5zvUtN8xe4W3fMHmqzsiM3XpB9YCqc_FBBeCI/edit#

Now that the HBEB is open-sourced, it’s only going to be as good as the information its users supply. Thanks in advance for your help in keeping this up date.

Evolution of pathogen and parasite avoidance behaviours

Theo Murphy meeting
Monday 12 – Tuesday 13 June 2017
The Royal Society at Chicheley Hall, home of the Kavli Royal Society International Centre
Organised by Dr Rachel McMullan and Cecile Sarabian
https://royalsociety.org/science-events-and-lectures/2017/06/evolution-pathogen-parasite/

Avoidance behaviours protect species as diverse as worms, ants, fish, monkeys and humans from infection by reducing or preventing contact with parasites and pathogens. This meeting will unite researchers working in invertebrates, vertebrates and humans to discuss the evolution of pathogen avoidance behaviour and how these avoidance instincts can be harnessed to improve animal and human health around the world. Join us to network with researchers working in a diversity of experimental models to share techniques and knowledge and form multidisciplinary collaborations.
This is a residential conference, which allows for increased discussion and networking.

  • Free to attend
  • Registration is essential (please request an invitation)
  • Catering and accommodation are available to purchase at registration